SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2016

Study shows effectiveness of new HIV therapy drugs on infected children

The study was supported by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. | File photo
Louise Kuhn, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, has been studying the effects of switching HIV therapy drugs after achieving viral suppression.

It's recommended that children older than 3 use efavirenz-based therapy.

Based on evaluations by Kuhn and her team, reports show that the change in treatment had excellent results, with sustained control of the virus. Previously, there had been concerns about the effectiveness of efavirenz in children who had already been exposed to nevirapine. They are in the same drug class, meaning those who still become infected would possibly not respond to efavirenz.

Now, however, Kuhn's research provides hope that the treatment of children can align with adult treatment to continue suppression, leading to better health and longer life.

The research showed that switching drugs compared with the continuation of ritonavir-boosted, lopinavir-based therapy didn't result in significantly higher rates of viral rebound.

The study was supported by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The Mailman School is the third-largest recipient of NIH grants based on a survey of schools for pubic health and has over 450 interdisciplinary faculty members working in over 100 countries to address health issues.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH 722 W 168th St New York, NY 10032-3727

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