TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2016

Experimental Ebola drug ZMapp requires further research

The ZMapp treatment includes three separate laboratory-made antibodies to treat the virus. | File photo

ZMapp, an experimental treatment for the Ebola virus, may be beneficial to Ebola patients but there is still a lack of data from its developer, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., to determine whether it can be used to treat humans.

The initial results were taken from the company’s controlled, randomized PREVAIL II trial, which was conducted in March 2015. The study's goal was to determine whether the drug could be used with standard Ebola care to improve patient outcomes.

The treatment includes three separate laboratory-made antibodies to treat the virus. The drug, a monoclonal antibody cocktail, has shown promise as a well-tolerated treatment.

There were 72 adults and children, all of whom had Ebola infections, enrolled in the study. Twelve were from Guinea, five from Liberia, 54 from Sierra Leone and one from the U.S. The initial goal was to enroll 200 volunteers.

Because there has been a declining number of Ebola cases, the study did not have sufficient volunteers to find if the treatment is better than the current use of supportive care. This includes balancing electrolytes for sustaining bodily functions, offering intravenous fluids, and monitoring health blood pressure and oxygen levels.

The study was presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

Organizations in this story

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) 5601 Fishers Lane, MSC 9806 Bethesda, MD 20892-9806

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