SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2016

Brown University researchers analyze racial disparity in HIV, Hodgkin lymphoma

HIV patients have a 20 percent greater risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma than people without HIV infections. | File photo
A recent study from Brown University shows a noticeable racial disparity among populations that have HIV and Hodgkin lymphoma.

The study demonstrates a large portion of people who have HIV and Hodgkin lymphoma are black. Unfortunately, these same people are less like to have chemotherapy treatments.

HIV patients have a 20 percent greater risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma than people without HIV infections. Historically, HIV has been higher among the black population even while the virus declines among whites.

The study, which appears in AIDS journal, does not identify the cause for this disparity. Several factors that are socioeconomic, medical and epidemiological may affect the statistical outcome.

"Black patients have higher rates of not receiving treatment," Dr. Adam Olszewski, lead author of the study and associate professor of medicine in the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a physician in the Cancer Center of Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, said. "Hodgkin lymphoma is generally believed to be highly curable. We have an expectation to cure over 90 percent of early stage patients and even 70-80 percent of quite advanced cases."

Organizations in this story

Brown University 75 Waterman St Providence, RI 02912

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