WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2016

HIV death rate higher in southern US

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that the death rates for HIV patients in the southern U.S. are three times higher than the death rates for HIV patients in other regions of the U.S.

This report includes 2012 data about the prevention methods and care treatments for HIV patients in each state. The significant differences between the southern U.S. and other states are most obvious with two important factors: the death rates of HIV patients and whether HIV patients know their status.

In 2012, the death rate for HIV patients in the U.S. stood at 19.2 deaths for every 1,000 people who have HIV. For individual states, this figure varies from 7.9 deaths for every 1,000 HIV-positive patients (Vermont) to 30.8 deaths in Louisiana.

“It is unacceptable that people with HIV living in many Southern states are more likely to die than those living in other parts of the country,” Jonathan Mermin, director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, said. “Some states are making great strides toward getting people with HIV diagnosed and into care, but every state must do this if we are to reach our national goals for prevention and care.”

Organizations in this story

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1600 Clifton Rd Atlanta, GA 30329

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