THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2016

Intranasal virus-like particle vaccine shown to be effective against influenza A virus

Intranasal virus-like particle vaccine may be effective against influenza A virus. | Courtesy of medicalexpo.com
A study published Tuesday in mBios, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) journal, has found that an intranasal virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine offers broad protection to mice against several subtypes of influenza A virus.

The influenza virus is a public health problem around the world. It causes notable mortality and morbidity in yearly pandemics and epidemics.

The traditional method used to prevent the yearly influenza is to create a new vaccine every year, each vaccine targeting a specific strain of the circulating virus. Experts have said that it is unlikely that this current method will provide adequate protection against any new pandemic viruses or antigenically divergent strains with hemagglutinin (HA) subtype, which would be entirely new.

In light of this, scientists have been working to create a “universal” vaccine to protect people against all viruses categorized as influenza A.

In the recent study, scientists proved that an intranasal VLP vaccine cocktail protected mice against a range of lethal infections of influenza A virus. There was a 94 percent aggregate survival after the vaccine.

The vaccine cocktail contained a blend of VLPs with H3, H1, H5, or H6 HAs. The mice that received the vaccinations had significant protection against 1957 H2, 1918 H1 and avian H6, H5, H10, H11 and H7 hemagglutinin subtypes.

The ASM’s mission is to gain a better understanding of basic life processes and to promote the application of this knowledge for improved health and economic and environmental well-being.

Organizations in this story

American Society for Microbiology 1752 N St NW Washington, DC 20036

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