THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2016

HIV vaccine study produces antibodies in animal subjects

HIV vaccine study produces antibodies in animal subjects | Courtesy of medicalexpo.com

Three study teams recently showed that they have developed an HIV vaccine that produces relevant antibodies to fight HIV within animal cells.

Three separate studies, all funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) branch of the National Institutes of Health, were recently published in journals Science and Cell. All three showed significant progress in creating a vaccine for HIV, and all three also showed that there are specific techniques that are successful in creating antibodies within animal cells to fight the virus.

One study -- available in Science -- showed that a laboratory-designed molecular complex can provoke strong neutralizing antibodies within monkeys and rabbits to fend off HIV strains.

A second study -- available in Cell -- showed that a successful HIV vaccine must provoke antibodies that will fight against a variety of HIV strains.

The third study, also available in Science, demonstrated that engineer proteins can provoke B cells to create antibodies to fight against a variety of HIV strains. This was successful in genetically modified mice, as they were able to produce antibodies that qualified as precursors to the VRC01 antibody.

All three studies show that scientists have reached a crucial point that will prove to be a starting platform; researchers can use this to create HIV vaccines to provoke broadly neutralizing antibodies in humans.

Organizations in this story

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) 5601 Fishers Lane, MSC 9806 Bethesda, MD 20892-9806

National Institutes of Health 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, MD 20892

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