TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2016

GlaxoSmithKline’s shingles vaccine protects people over 50

GSK shingles vaccine protects people over 50 | Courtesy of globalresearch.ca
A recent study suggests that GlaxoSmithKline’s (GSK) shingles vaccine, which has Agenus’ QS-21 Stimulon Adjuvant, offers approximately 97 percent protection for people 50 years old and above.

The vaccine, called HZ/su, has been presented at the 25th Scientific Conference of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ECCMID), which took place in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The vaccine includes the Stimulon Adjuvant to enhance the immune system’s response to the antigens invading the body. The primary and secondary endpoint data is from a recent randomized Phase 3 trial.

Compared to the placebo, GSK’s HZ/su shingles vaccine reduced the risk of contract singles by 97.2 percent in test subjects who were 50 years and older. This notable percentage of protection continued through all the age groups involved in the study: 96.6 percent in adults ages 50 to 59, 97.4 percent in adults ages 60 to 69, and 97.9 percent in adults ages 70 and above. Myalgia, fatigue and soreness at the injection site were the most common side effects.

“The vast majority of adults over age 50 are at high risk of reactivating the varicella zoster virus, which leads to shingles and its painful and debilitating symptoms,” Garo Armen, Ph.D., chairman and CEO of Agenus, said. “These clinical results point to the broad benefits that widespread use of this vaccine could bring to adults over 50 worldwide. These data, and those from GSK’s RTS,S malaria vaccine now undergoing regulatory review by the EMA, highlight the importance and value that we believe QS-21 Stimulon brings to vaccines and to Agenus.”

Further details about the study can be found in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Organizations in this story

European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Aeschenvorstadt 57 4051 Basel SWITZERLAND ,

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