SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2016

CDC, Georgia Institute collaborate on microneedle patch for measles vaccine

The microneedle patch is approximately a square centimeter.
The Georgia Institute of Technology and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are developing a microneedle patch that could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

The microneedle patch is approximately a square centimeter. Lined with 100 microneedles made of sugar, polymer and vaccine, the patch is administered with the press of a thumb.  The microneedles, which are a fraction of a millimeter long,  press into the upper layers of the skin, dissolving within a few minutes and releasing the vaccine.

"Each day, 400 children are killed by measles complications worldwide," James Goodson, epidemiologist from the CDC's Global Immunization Division, said. "With no needles, syringes, sterile water or sharps disposals needed, the microneedle patch offers great hope of a new tool to reach the world's children faster, even in the most remote areas. This advancement would be a major boost in our efforts to eliminate this disease, with more vaccines administered and more lives saved at less cost.”

Georgia Tech and CDC's Global Immunization Division and Division of Viral Diseases recently completed a study showing the new microneedle patch yields a strong immune response in rhesus macaques. Human clinical trials could begin as early as 2017.

Organizations in this story

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1600 Clifton Rd Atlanta, GA 30329

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