MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2016

World Bank gives $7 million credit to Djibouti for healthcare improvement

The World Bank and Djibouti signed an agreement on Tuesday for a $7 million credit to implement a healthcare project that will improve health care quality and accessibility to 300,000 citizens, mainly women and children.

Ilyas Moussa Dawaleh, Djibouti's minister of finance and economy and Igner Anderson, WB vice president for the Middle East and North Africa region, signed the agreement, in the hopes of helping improve the health care sector in the country. Djibouti's health indicators place them as one of the lowest ranking countries globally.

This agreement is one step of many towards reaching Djibouti's health-related Millennium Development Goals. The country hopes to increase the overall delivery of health care services, along with increasing accessibility of medicine and health care management.

"The World Bank has been a steady and reliable partner in the health sector in Djibouti," Ilyas Moussa Dawaleh said. "I am pleased that this new project remains focused on the most essential health and health care needs of the mothers and their children and the communicable diseases that pose the most serious threat to the health of our population."

The program roll-out will provide financial rewards to health care providers and institutions which make their services more accessible to the community. Those with the most urgent needs include woman and children in the fight against HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

"This project has drawn on lessons learned from previous World Bank-financed health projects and will be balanced with what other development partners are doing in support of the government's efforts," Inger Andersen said. "It will assist Djibouti in its efforts to deliver better maternal and child healthcare services and improved communicable disease control programs."

The World Bank International Development Association, established in 1960 to provide interest-free loans, or credits, to underdeveloped nations, financed this project.