Hand, foot and mouth outbreak kills 98 in Vietnam

According to the World Health Organization, an outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease has caused the deaths of 98 children in Vietnam and sickened more than 42,000 others this year.
Three-quarters of the deaths have been in children three years old or younger, the Associated Press reports. The outbreak this year is a sharp increase over previous years, with 10,000 to 15,000 cases reported each year since 2008 and about 20 to 30 children dying annually.
The WHO statement quoted Vietnam's health minister as saying that cases may increase in coming months when preschools and kindergartens resume. The disease is spread by coughing, sneezing and contact with fluid from blisters or infected feces. There is no vaccine, but illness is typically mild and most children will recover quickly.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the disease begins with malaise, fever, poor appetite and often a sore throat. After one or two days, painful sores typically develop in the mouth that blister and become ulcers followed by a non-itchy skin rash with flat or raised red spots. A person with the disease may have only the rash or only the mouth sores. Infected persons are most contagious during the first week of the disease. Those who have not been infected with an enterovirus that causes HMFD are at risk for infection, though not all who become infected with the virus will become ill with the disease.