Half of Americans still distrust vaccines

Only half of Americans are confident in their belief that vaccines do not play a role in the development of autism, a new poll has revealed.

According to the poll, the other half say that they believe in a connection or are not sure either way, according to

The Harris Interactive and HealthDay produced poll demonstrates just how pervasive the fear is of an autism and vaccine link.

Out of 2,026 adults surveyed, 52 percent said that they believe vaccines do not cause autism. Of the remaining 48 percent, 18 percent said that they believe vaccines are a cause of the disorder. Thirty percent confessed that they are uncertain, reports.

The survey comes only weeks after an investigation by the British Medical Journal concluded that the research first suggesting a link between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, or MMR vaccine, was nothing more than an elaborate fraud that the author, Andrew Wakefield, crafted to secure financial gains.

The original study, conducted by Wakefield, was published in the journal the Lancet. Last year, that publication retracted the study and Wakefield was stripped of his license to practice in the United Kingdom.

Of those polled, 64 percent said that they were familiar with the Wakefield study, but only 47 percent were aware that the study had been retracted.