U.S. to collaborate with India on global disease detection center

The recent visit of Barack Obama to India has yielded the signing of a memorandum of understanding between India and the U.S. to create and operate a new global disease detection center in New Delhi.

The plan includes a collaboration between the National Center for Disease Control in India and the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, The Economic Times reports.

“Because the wealth of a nation also depends on the health of its people, we’ll continue to support India’s efforts against diseases like tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS,” Obama said, reports. “As global partners, we’ll work to improve global health by preventing the spread of pandemic flu.”

The goal is to facilitate human resource development in laboratory and epidemiology to share best practices of detection and the response to emerging infections. The plan would also include advanced training for surveillance of emerging infectious diseases, the field of epidemiology, international health and the mentoring of professionals in the public health field.

“The future demands a renewed focus on wellness and preventive healthcare,” Preetha Reddy, managing director of Apollo hospitals group, said, according to “We are keen on bi-national partnerships to battle chronic disease. Diseases do not recognize boundaries and therefore it is important that we foster greater research collaboration.”

The collaboration also focuses on using advanced new technology in the creation of additional laboratory capacity in India for the diagnosis of emerging infectious diseases. The deal will be valid for a five year period.