WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

Children in U.S. showing higher hepatitis B immunity

According to a study conducted by George N. Ioannou from the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, children and adolescents in the United States have much higher rates of immunity against the hepatitis B virus than adults. Read More »

Pakistan begins nationwide polio vaccinations

A three day anti-polio campaign throughout the nation of Pakistan began on Tuesday in an effort to immunize against the potentially debilitating and paralytic disease in every corner of the country. Read More »

Who's European director says vaccination goals attainable

The World Health Organization Read More »

Hospitalizations, deaths from flu on the rise

As the 2010-2011 influenza season progresses, the data shows rates of influenza-related deaths, hospitalizations and outpatient doctor visits beginning to rise. Read More »

New cholera test may aid in stopping disease

University of South Florida scientists have recently developed a new test that may aid in helping to stop the spread of cholera. Read More »

Rwanda on track to become malaria-free

If all goes according to plan, Rwanda might become the first country in its region to become malaria-free. Read More »

Minnesota hit by sagging vaccination rates

A new report released by Children Read More »

No connection found between vaccinations and Japanese deaths

A Japanese health ministry panel of experts has found no direct connection between vaccines made by Sanofi-Aventis SA and Pfizer Inc. and the deaths of four children, though further safety checks of the vaccine manufacturers will be required. Read More »

Molecule can be used to detect TB in cells

A new method using a small molecule has been developed to detect tuberculosis inside cells. Read More »

Chemotherapy drug can kill malaria parasite

Scientists have discovered that a new class of chemotherapy drugs is also effective at killing the parasite that causes malaria. Read More »

Zostavax recipients shed varicella virus through saliva

According to a recent research study, some of the patients inoculated with Zostavax shed the varicella virus through their saliva and inoculation sites for a month after immunization. Read More »

Mutant antigen may improve meningitis vaccine development

A recent study has identified a new mutant vaccine antigen that may improve the development of an effective meningitis vaccine. Read More »

Investigators find no impropriety in WHO's handling of H1N1 pandemic

Independent experts investigating the World Health Organization Read More »

Single mutation could make H1N1 much more deadly

Scientists have discovered that a single mutation in the H1N1 swine flu virus could make the illness far more virulent. Read More »

Vaccine researchers warn of return of 1957 flu

Three vaccine researchers from the National Institutes of Health say that influenza A/H2N2 viruses, which caused the flu pandemic in 1957 and 1958, might return and lead to a pandemic similar to the H1N1 epidemic in 2009. Read More »

Haitian cholera death toll hits 4,672

An official report by the Ministry of Public Health and Population in Haiti states that the death toll due to the cholera epidemic has risen to 4,672 since the detection of the first case in October 2010. Read More »

Somalian cholera outbreak kills 20

Doctors are reporting that an outbreak of cholera in Somalia Read More »

African leads pledge to end malaria by 2015

The United Nations envoy tasked with coordinating efforts against malaria has reported that African leaders are at the forefront of a landmark initiative to end unnecessary deaths from the disease by 2015. Read More »

Research shows that flu vaccine efficacy measures could be wrong

According to research from the University of Michigan, a particular measure of flu vaccine efficacy that has been used for a number of past controlled trials is not accurate, leading to overselling the protection the vaccines provide. Read More »

TB treatment success rates found to be higher in women

A study conducted by Dr. KS Sachdeva of the Revised National TB Control Program of the government of India found that tuberculosis treatment success rates were higher in women than they were in men. Read More »